Book Creator

HASTINGS

by DELELLIS SAVERIO

Pages 2 and 3 of 33

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Index
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Chapter 1. Background Page 4 & 5, 6 & 7
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Chapter 2. Hastings
Page 8 & 9, 10 &11
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Chapter 3. Doomsday
Page 12 &13, 14 & 15
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Index
Background
It was a hot summer in London. With a population of around 14000 people, at the beginning of 11th century London was a prosperous medieval city, whose economy was based on the cultivation of barley and wheat. Moreover, religious orders such as the Augustinian became major players in the trade of wool. In general England was more than self-sufficient in cereals, beef and dairy products, with its economy resembling that of London. The ruling class of this large and successful system was formed by Anglo-Saxon noblemen who swore loyalty to the family, or clan. The individual nature of this corporations led to a division of
England into seven kingdoms, a situation commonly called Heptarchy. However this system began falling when Scandinavian populations, which were called Danes by the Anglo-Saxons, started occupying the northeast of England by the early years of 9th century. For about 200 years the Anglo- Saxons attempted to keep the invaders out of Wessex, the most important kingdom. Eventually in 991,when the Anglo-Saxon paid money to be left alone it became clear that Saxon England was collapsing. Despite this, during 11th century a lot of kings tried to contain the Danish invasion: for instance Harold, William the Confessor's successor
Background
England into seven kingdoms, a situation commonly called Heptarchy. However this system began falling when Scandinavian populations, which were called Danes by the Anglo-Saxons, started occupying the northeast of England by the early years of 9th century. For about 200 years the Anglo- Saxons attempted to keep the invaders out of Wessex, the most important kingdom. Eventually in 991,when the Anglo-Saxon paid money to be left alone it became clear that Saxon England was collapsing. Despite this, during 11th century a lot of kings tried to contain the Danish invasion: for instance Harold, William the Confessor's successor
fought the Vikings in several occasions and he managed to defeat them, before marching south to meet Wiliam, duke of Normandy...
Harold II, last Anglo-Saxon king of England
William, duke of Normandy
Hastings
It was 14th October 1066. Even though it was still autumn, it was freezing. The wind blew all over the woods near Hastings, a harsh plain surrounded by woods and a big swamp. In the mind of Anglo-Saxon king Harold there were contrasting thoughts. He had managed to defeat the Danes previously and the only dangerous enemy he had to face was William, duke of Normandy. Although he was not sure whether William's army was strong or not, he was confident about his preparation for an eventual battle. The Anglo-Saxon king had been marching south for 3 weeks to face William's invasion. Severely sleep-deprived
and fatigued, the previous night he had several confused dreams about the upcoming battle, the destiny of his beloved empire and it was as if he had not slept at all. The Anglo-Saxon king was not surprised when he saw a big group of archers coming towards his army. As a result Harold's troops went back and they positioned themselves on a hill to form a shield. Unfortunately, at about 10 am the shield was successfully penetrated by the Normans. Harold's army was uncovered so William decided to surround it with a tactical manoeuvre, sending knights from behind the hill and continuing to move forward with the archers. At that moment the real battle began
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