Book Creator

Developing My Professional Identity

by Lara Fourie

Pages 2 and 3 of 15

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My Teaching Philosophy
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When I compare my previous teaching philosophy to what I
have learned and to how I have developed, I have noticed a change. After
completing this teaching experience, I have considerately developed my skills. This includes being able to teach with confidence, communicate better with learners and overall lesson planning. I have learned the compassion needed to work with some learners through observing them and through interacting with them. Creative and innovative thinking is a specific skill that I have used and developed a lot through this teaching experience as I thought of fun ways to teach.

In my previous teaching philosophy, my views were very much based on a specific demographic of learners. Now that I have completed my final year of teaching experience in diverse classes, I can recognise the importance of focusing on all demographics in my teaching, and not only necessarily on a demographic focused on lower-income families. Although the system’s theory of Bronfenbrenner is very important to understand, I recognise now that this should not be the only theory that I base my teaching philosophy on. This systems theory specifically focuses on how a learner’s environment can shape them. It is however important to recognise that a learner should not only be understood through looking at their environment or be labelled in any specific way according to their home-environment. For this reason, my teaching philosophy has developed using democratic educational theories.


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My Teaching Philosophy (Continued)
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Through adopting a democratic view on education, I am able to recognise each and every learner’s importance, based on their personal skills, not on their environment. Furthermore, through basing my teaching philosophy on a democratic view on education I am able to create a learning environment that ‘engages students in building a strong classroom community, taking responsibility in cocreating curriculum, and engaging in critical dialogue on issues that impact their lives’ (Collins, Hess & Lowery, 2019).