Book Creator

CONT 904

by Alyshia Badial

Cover

Comic Panel 1
Loading...
A REFLECTION TO
Loading...
SPECIAL EDUCATION
Loading...
CONT 904 003 SPR 2022
Loading...
By: Alyshia Badial
Module 1
In this chapter I discuss my reflection as I complete module 1.
What did I begin to understand?
In module 1, one concept that I began to understand was the difference between high and low categories. This was a term I heard a lot from my first year teaching, particularly in the student support center and among support staff. Previously, I interpreted high and low categories as the type of severity, which I guess in some aspects was a relevant inference, but now have understood that they are categorized based on the occurrence of the disability in children in high or low numbers. Low incident categories include but are not limited to visual or hearing impairments and high incident categories include but are not limited to ASD or intellectual disabilities. In understanding this concept I was able to further understand the process and allocation of funding for special needs. As a teacher you often hear, especially if you have students with an IEP, “They do not receive funding,” or “Their funding is taken from another student's funding.” This often confused me as I thought that this may be unethical to take the money from one student and give it to another? Yet in understanding how funding in B.C is allocated, the issue of a lack of funding is evident as the percentage of high and low incident categories have become more even, sitting at an estimated 5%. (Rozworski, 2018) As Rozworski shares in his research, “school districts received in special education grants on average 53 percent of what they spent on special education in each of those ten years.” As a teacher, it is evident in the classroom and school that there is not enough funding for what is actually needed.
Oftentimes we see this as our colleagues are spending their own money for supplies or creating DIY’s. The way BC has decided to allocate funding is outdated and does not truly reflect the concepts of inclusivity in the classroom, but rather ignores it. The way funding is allocated, does not take into consideration factors such as location, school size or accessibility. In northern BC, where there are remote areas and schools, particularly the Indigenous schools is what came to mind, the current funding formula does not allocate any money for these extra considerations. Therefore, a school in Vancouver could receive the same funding as a remote school, who would not have access to the same resources, supplies or assistance. As Rozworski shares, “The sizable and persistent province-wide gap conceals some significant variation and inequity between school districts.” An interesting take away from Rozworksi is that because certain diagnoses are more prevalent, does not mean that they require less accommodation or support. Our school system and classrooms have a long way to go to achieve true inclusions in each and every classroom, and to do so funding is still needed.
Oftentimes we see this as our colleagues are spending their own money for supplies or creating DIY’s. The way BC has decided to allocate funding is outdated and does not truly reflect the concepts of inclusivity in the classroom, but rather ignores it. The way funding is allocated, does not take into consideration factors such as location, school size or accessibility. In northern BC, where there are remote areas and schools, particularly the Indigenous schools is what came to mind, the current funding formula does not allocate any money for these extra considerations. Therefore, a school in Vancouver could receive the same funding as a remote school, who would not have access to the same resources, supplies or assistance. As Rozworski shares, “The sizable and persistent province-wide gap conceals some significant variation and inequity between school districts.” An interesting take away from Rozworksi is that because certain diagnoses are more prevalent, does not mean that they require less accommodation or support. Our school system and classrooms have a long way to go to achieve true inclusions in each and every classroom, and to do so funding is still needed.
Ellipse;
What did I know before starting this module?
Click on the speaker button to listen to a audio recording of my reflection.
How will I implement what I learned in the field of education?
A big takeaway from Module 1 for myself was the Salamanca Statement. As an educator the Salamanca Statement emphasized the importance of the principles of inclusion and the idea of a “school for all.” (España. Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, 1994) One statement that really stuck with was, “”It assumes that human differences are normal and that learning must accordingly be adapted to the needs of the child rather than the child fitted to preordained assumptions regarding the pace and nature of the learning process.” (España. Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, 1994) As an educator it is important to recognize that inclusion is essential to dignity. In implementing this practice in my classroom I am going to start with adapting the physical space of my classroom.Following the concept and theories of Universal Design for Learning I think that the first and easier place to start is to look at the physical outlay of how our classrooms are set up. Following Salamanca’s statement, children cannot fit into our box but we must make enough room for their circle, triangle or oval. Ways I can implement this way of thinking is looking at the adaptations that my students have and creating safe spaces for them to work.
PrevNext