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Easter

by Nato Khuroshvili

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Easter Tradition
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For followers of Christian faiths, Easter Sunday is an incredibly important holiday. Shortly after the close of Lent, Catholics and Christians alike gather to attend church services, reflect on Easter Bible verses, and welcome warmer weather with spring-inspired Sunday celebrations. Developed over years both in America and around the world, the Easter traditions that mark the holiday have offered
It's very likely that children play an important role in the origin of the fun side of Easter. In particular, annual Easter egg hunts, whether at home, with friends and neighbors, at local parks, or churches, are one of the most fun Easter traditions for kids to participate in. "For Christians, this is a serious holy day, dealing with issues of life and death," says Robin Knowles Wallace, the author of The Christian Year: A Guide for Worship and Preaching. "Because of the difficulty of sharing these big issues in age-appropriate ways, sometimes we divert to the more lighthearted symbols of eggs and rabbits, hence the proliferation of Easter egg hunts at churches."
Why Do We Eat Easter Chocolate? 
Where does all the chocolate come from? "The tradition of chocolate eggs began in 19th-century France and Germany, and soon spread to the rest of Europe and eventually the United States," says Katherine Tegen, the author of The Story of the Easter Bunny. "To receive the special Easter eggs, children were told to make nests from hats or baskets so the Easter Bunny could leave them there." Killinger says that many Christians are also eager to eat chocolate on Easter because it's a common modern-day sacrifice during Lent.
Among the most popular sweet treats associated with this day are chocolate eggs, which date back to early 19th century Europe. Eggs have long been associated with Easter as a symbol of new life and Jesus’ resurrection. Another egg-shaped candy, the jelly bean, became associated with Easter in the 1930s (although the jelly bean’s origins reportedly date all the way back to a Biblical-era concoction called a Turkish Delight). 
Lamb and Other Traditional Easter Foods
. Christians refer to Jesus as the “Lamb of God,” though lamb at Easter also has roots in early Passover celebrations. In the story of Exodus, the people of Egypt suffered a series of terrible plagues, including the death of all firstborn sons. Members of the Jewish faith painted their doorposts with sacrificed lamb’s blood so that God would “pass over” their homes. Jews who converted to Christianity continued the tradition of eating lamb at Easter. Historically, lamb would have been one of the first fresh meats available after a long winter with no livestock to slaughter.
Lamb is a traditional Easter food.
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