Book Creator

Literature Circles

by Pollux Thain

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Literature Circles
A collection of weekly artifacts and reflections
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by Pollux Thain

Member of Group 6 the Ringo Dingoes
Week 10 - Literature Circle

Chapters: Forward and Ch. 1 (viii-15)
Role: Word Wizard
intergenerational - relating to, involving, or affecting several subsequent generations (p. xv)
assimilation - the absorption and integration of peoples, ideas, or culture into a wider society or culture (p. xv)
Inuvialuktun - the language of the Inuvialuit, the indigenous people who's traditional territory spans the western Arctic (p. 5)
Relection
coal oil lamp - a lighting device that uses coal oil, also know as kerosene, as a fuel source (p. 5)
atikluk - or a Mother Hubbard parka is a traditional parka worn by Inuit women of the western Arctic (p. 6)
parka - an article of clothing for winter in the Arctic made of down collected from geese in the spring. The fur of the hood would be fox, wolf or wolverine most commonly (p. 6)
kamik - a type of boot worn by the Inuit. Also known as mukluks (p. 7)
Delta braid - a decoration made by cutting patterns from long strips of fabric and layering them on each other (p. 11)
Tuktoyaktuk - is a hamlet north of the Arctic circle. It is called Tuktuyaaqtuuq in Inuvialuktun which means "place resembling a caribou" in English (p. 11)
Aklavik - is a hamlet in the Northwest Territories. Until 1961 it served as a regional administrative centre for the territorial government. Aklavik means "barren ground grizzly place" in English (p. 12)
bale - a bound-up bundle for easier movement of a large collection of objects, in this case pelts (p. 13)
I think that I initially struggled with my role this week. I was under my own impression that the words highlighted by the authors were not allowed to be included since they already presented the definition. I also was able to identify all of the words throughout the preface and the first chapter. When we met as a group I explained my reasoning as to why I only had two words: coal oil lamp and bale. My group was under a different impression than I was and we agreed that any words throughout the assigned portion of text were fair use. I added to my list and think that I made a fairly comprehensible list from the first section of the novel.
A Delta braid
Relection
I think that I initially struggled with my role this week. I was under my own impression that the words highlighted by the authors were not allowed to be included since they already presented the definition. I also was able to identify all of the words throughout the preface and the first chapter. When we met as a group I explained my reasoning as to why I only had two words: coal oil lamp and bale. My group was under a different impression than I was and we agreed that any words throughout the assigned portion of text were fair use. I added to my list and think that I made a fairly comprehensible list from the first section of the novel.
Week 11 - Literature Circle

Chapters: 2 & 3 (pp. 16-43)
Role: Connector
Makes links between the book and group members’ lives, school and neighbourhood happenings, historical events, or other books by the same author or on the same topic.

A personal connection of mine is the naming part in Chapter 3 on page 35. Names are an important part of identity and with my name I often get it confused with similar names like Alex or Paul. I am fortunate/privileged enough to either ignore them and move past it or simply correct them. Olemaun cannot express the importance of her name like I can.

Ideas or experiences of a certain way things will play out is much different than reality. The main character is so focused on the end goal of reading that she has purposely blinded herself to the negative aspects of school. Personally I have been blinded by the end in sight even though I had multiple warnings throughout the process that what I was doing was questionable. It always ends up the same and on page 43 Olemaun has the realization of "why had [she] been so eager to come [to school]".
The challenges of being a connector within the context of this novel and its topic/themes is every connection diminishes the gravity of the situation. My name being mistaken at a fast food restaurant and me correcting the staff is connected to an eight year old having the name given to her by her grandfather stolen and replaced. They are not the same and I almost feel like my connection to that takes away from it.

It is important to find connections between the book and group members’ lives, school and neighbourhood happenings to get a "closer to home" view on any given topic. The topic of residential schools and other atrocities against the First Nations, Métis, and Inuit needs to be discussed but connecting it to my life can dim the voices of those who need to be heard more.
Reflection
The challenges of being a connector within the context of this novel and its topic/themes is every connection diminishes the gravity of the situation. My name being mistaken at a fast food restaurant and me correcting the staff is connected to an eight year old having the name given to her by her grandfather stolen and replaced. They are not the same and I almost feel like my connection to that takes away from it.

It is important to find connections between the book and group members’ lives, school and neighbourhood happenings to get a "closer to home" view on any given topic. The topic of residential schools and other atrocities against the First Nations, Métis, and Inuit needs to be discussed but connecting it to my life can dim the voices of those who need to be heard more.
Week 12 - Literature Circle

Chapter: 4 (pp. 44-51)
Role: Summarizer
Classes started as summer ends but Olemaun is surprised to see that the Raven is her teacher and not Sister MacQuilan. Olemaun’s first reading lesson is not as she expected as the Raven asks her in English so Olemaun does not now what is required of her and “[she] didn’t even know which page to turn to” (Jordan-Fenton & Pokiak Fenton, p.45). The Raven belittles her and forces her to clean the chalk boards. As the term continues the Raven focuses more on chores than education and has Olemaun mop the floors, tidy rooms and empty the honey buckets.

One October evening Olemaun refuses to eat her cabbage soup which the Raven has an issue with. The Raven gives her a rag to clean up the tables in the refectory. Olemaun talks back and pulls away from the Raven causing her to spill her soup on the Raven’s clothes. The Raven goes to hit Olemaun but Sister MacQuilan (the swan) steps in before that. Olemaun still has to clean all of the tables and the Raven is waiting for her as she finishes.
Reflection

This weeks chapter was short but demonstrated how I think most people would react to being in a school setting where one is viewed as less than. Olemaun is fighting back against unfair treatment and abuse that she receives from the Raven in particular. The power dynamic means speaking up for yourself or others often results in terrible consequences. I think this chapter is foreshadowing further abuse at the hand of the school.

I feel like the line from page 49 about Olemaun showing the Raven "...the spirit of the Inuvialut" is a direct way of standing strong against adversity and I think that the Raven and potentially other members of the school will try to break Olemaun down.

My work as the summarizer boiled this chapter into two main scenes the first classroom experience and the refectory.
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