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Deaf Education

by Sadbh Mulvaney

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DEAF
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EDUCATION
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SADBH MULVANEY
CONTENTS

Inclusivity in Ireland . . . . . . . . . . . .

Deaf education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Deaf Village Ireland . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Integration in mainstream schools


Personal experience . . . . . . . . . . . .

Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

About the author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

03

04

05

06


7

8

9

10

INCLUSIVITY IN IRELAND
The Education Act 1998 sets out the right to education for every person in the state. According to Section 7 of the Act, the Minister of Education is required to make sure that support services and education that is suitable for each individual living in the State, including those with disabilities or other special educational needs, are made available to them. The act promotes inclusion and equality of access, including provision for persons with disabilities or other special educational needs and sets forth the rights of parents to send their children to a school of their choice.

The legal foundation for the education of children with special educational needs is established by the Education for Persons with Special Educational Needs (EPSEN) Act of 2004. The goal of the EPSEN Act is that students with special education needs should get an adequate education in an inclusive setting wherever feasible, and they should have the same rights to an education as students without special education needs. Additionally, the statute gives the National Council for Special Education a legal foundation.

The Education (Admission to Schools) Act of 2018 brought about changes that will facilitate a child's enrollment in their neighborhood school. The Minister may, in accordance with Section 8 - Special Classes, require a school to establish a special class or classes or make other accommodations for students with special educational needs if the National Council for Special Education (NCSE) determines that such accommodations are necessary in a given area. This legislation will guarantee that, in the event that the NCSE identifies a gap in the education of children with special needs and no school is willing to fill it, the minister can effectively close the gap by issuing a directive to the school.

The Education Act 1998, EPSEN Act 2004, Admissions Act 2018

DEAF EDUCATION
Currently, there are three schools in Ireland that cater for the deaf. Teaching a kid in two languages—in this case, English and Irish Sign Language. The Irish Deaf Society advocates this type of instruction since it allows deaf children to be taught in their own tongue. They will learn Irish Sign Language considerably quicker than a second language like written English since they will naturally be able to understand facial expressions and body language. Learning in a language they can understand improves cognitive development and fosters intellectual advancement. It also improves literacy and increases the likelihood of passing exams.


DEAF VILLAGE IRELAND
Here is Deaf Village Ireland, which caters for one of three deaf schools in Ireland.

INTEGRATION IN MAINSTREAM SCHOOLS
These units can be found in a number of Irish schools. At any particular time, the number of deaf children enrolling may be rather small. Mixed-age children can be taught at the same time in the same group. Parents may choose to enrol their child in a nearby mainstream school because it makes sense that they would not want to send their child to an institution that is far from home. In mainstream education, a kid who is deaf or hard of hearing is included in a classroom with hearing students. A standard classroom with more than 20 hearing pupils might be difficult for a deaf child to navigate, and they might not receive the additional support they need.
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