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Animal trafficking

by Mateo Caceres

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Animal Trafficking
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Trafficking in species, which 
includes animals and plants, is one
of the most harmful and 
profitable illicit businesses in the world.
This crime against nature moves between 10,000 and 20,000 million euros each year, a figure comparable to that which moves the one that moves and drugs.
Every day, more than 80 elephants are killed to obtain ivory from their tusks and to continue with the rhythm of extermination, in just 15 years we could be witnesses of the disappearance of wild elephants.
This is just one example of the magnitude of species trafficking, a crime that includes both the illicit trade in live exotic animals and illegal hunting.
Every day, more than 80 elephants are killed to obtain ivory from their tusks and to continue with the rhythm of extermination, in just 15 years we could be witnesses of the disappearance of wild elephants.
This is just one example of the magnitude of species trafficking, a crime that includes both the illicit trade in live exotic animals and illegal hunting.
Myths such as the belief in Vietnam that rhino horn cures cancer or that tiger bones and whiskers are a remedy against malaria in China generates a demand for these products that, to a large extent, is supplied through illegal hunting.
The trafficking of species is a crime of international dimensions, with a growing demand and whose sanctions remain lax despite the fact that the survival of endangered animals is at serious risk and is wiping out wildlife in many countries.
Although it is sanctioned by international conventions such as CITES, it is less persecuted than other types of illegal trade.
Mafias that traffic drugs and weapons are often also involved in the trafficking of animals and plants, and in many cases– especially in Africa – this bloody business has become a lucrative means of financing guerrillas and terrorist groups.
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