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Welsh in HSC

by Megan Melbourne & Obed Powell-Davies

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Cymraeg yn Iechyd a Gofal Cymdeithasol i Diwtoriaid

Welsh in Health and Social Care for Tutors
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Welsh language - fast facts

  • Welsh is one of the oldest languages in Europe. It evolved from Brythonic, the main language spoken in Wales, England and Southern Scotland when the Romans invaded in 43AD.
  • Welsh began to emerge as a distinctive language sometime between 400 and 700 AD – early Welsh poetry survives from this period. 
  • Over the following centuries, Welsh flourished and became the language of culture, law and everyday life.
  • Welsh continued as an official language during the early Middle Ages, despite the Anglo-Norman conquest.

You can enjoy learning more about Wales by following -

https://gdcg.blob.core.windows.net/learning-modules/generic-courses/tincans/Cyflwyno-Cymru/cymru-xapi-c5jhs8zo/index.html#/
You can enjoy learning more about Wales by following -

https://gdcg.blob.core.windows.net/learning-modules/generic-courses/tincans/Cyflwyno-Cymru/cymru-xapi-c5jhs8zo/index.html#/
What is the Lifelong Learning Wales record and the LA26
dataset?
For every course an FE institution in Wales registers, information is recorded about the course and reported to the Welsh Government on the Lifelong Learning Wales Record, or the LLWR. The LLWR records data on many aspects of post-16 provision.

The language of learner provision is recorded under the LLWR LA26 dataset and is used to monitor the use of Welsh in post-16 learning. Five codes are used to indicate varying levels of Welsh learning, from E1, where no Welsh is used, to B1, where learning is completed in a completely bilingual context. C1 learning is learning completed in a Welsh-medium context.
E1 - Learning and assessment in English only

B3 - A small amount of Welsh-medium learning e.g. use of Welsh limited to verbal communication
or to a minor part of the learning activity. English only assessment. This code can be used to
record situations where some Welsh is used during the learning. Minimum use of incidental Welsh
is not sufficient for it to be recorded. There needs to be Welsh language interaction between assessor/lecturer/teacher and learner for it to be a meaningful use of the language.
B2 - A significant amount of Welsh-medium learning e.g. both verbal and written Welsh used in
many, but not all, parts of the learning activity. Assessment mainly in English but some may also
be in Welsh.
E1 - Learning and assessment in English only

B3 - A small amount of Welsh-medium learning e.g. use of Welsh limited to verbal communication
or to a minor part of the learning activity. English only assessment. This code can be used to
record situations where some Welsh is used during the learning. Minimum use of incidental Welsh
is not sufficient for it to be recorded. There needs to be Welsh language interaction between assessor/lecturer/teacher and learner for it to be a meaningful use of the language.
B2 - A significant amount of Welsh-medium learning e.g. both verbal and written Welsh used in
many, but not all, parts of the learning activity. Assessment mainly in English but some may also
be in Welsh.
B1 - Learning completed in a bilingual context and at least 50 percent of the available
assessments within the learning activity completed through the medium of Welsh. The outcome
may be achieved using any appropriate teaching methodology.
C1 - Learning completed in a Welsh-medium context and all of the available assessments within
the learning activity completed through the medium of Welsh.
Where to begin

There are lots of simple things you can do to start bringing Welsh into your classroom. Even if you
are not a Welsh speaker yourself, or you are not yet confident in your Welsh language skills, there
are many things you can do to support the language skills of your learners. Let’s have a look at some
things you can do to make a start on your bilingual teaching journey.
Welsh Government Guidance document:
Welsh Government has produced the following document to support further education colleges to
develop their Welsh-medium and bilingual provision and to give confidence on how activity completed
in Welsh or bilingually should be recorded on LLWR.
  1. Find out where your learners are currently on their language journey

A good place to start is by establishing what Welsh language skills your students already have. There
are lots of ways of doing this, such as checking their records on the college systems or asking them
directly. However, students don’t always self-declare their Welsh language skills accurately for many
reasons. So, what can we do to get a better picture of what Welsh language skills our students have?
One effective way of doing this is through a task that asks them about their use of Welsh in an indirect
way. One example of such a task is ‘The Language Journey’ task.
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