Book Creator

INTEGRATION ACTIVITY

by Erick Avila

Pages 2 and 3 of 14

INTEGRATION ACTIVITY
UNIT 1
By Avila & Pelayo.
Loading...
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
Loading...
Escuela Nacional Preparatoria N° 2 "Erasmo Castellanos Quinto"
Loading...
Inglés VI
Loading...
KNOWLEDGE INTEGRATION ACTIVITY
Loading...
UNIT 1
Loading...
By
Avila Barba Erick Yahir
Pelayo Santiago Carlos Alberto
Loading...
September 22, 2022.
PARTS OF SPEECH
Parts of speech tell us how a word is used in a sentence.
NOUN
PRONOUN
ADJECTIVE
Naming a word.
Replaces a noun.
Describes something.
• Examples: table, car, Pedro.
• Examples: I, you, he, we.
• Examples: big, pink, short.
VERB
ADVERB
PREPOSITION
Is an action or a state.
Describes a verb.
Shows a relationship.
• Examples: go, have, look.
• Examples: easily, speedily, specifically.
• Examples: in, at, around.
CONJUNCTION
INTERJECTION
ARTICLE
Joins words or clauses.
Expresses emotions.
Talk about a noun in general.
• Exampes: and, so, but.
• Examples: Yeah!, Oops !
• Examples: a, an, the.
SENTENCE STRUCTURE
The basic structure of sentence in English contains subject, verb and complement, the subject is the person or thing that does something, the verb is an action and the object is the person or thing that receives the verb; is required word order: subject + verb + complement.
SUBJECT
+
VERB
SUBJECT
VERB
+
+
COMPLEMENT
SENTENCE PATTERNS
SUBJECT
VERB
+
+
ADJECTIVE
SUBJECT
VERB
+
+
ADVERB
SUBJECT
VERB
+
+
NOUN
EXPOSITIVE TEXTS
The main purpose of expository text is to inform or describe. Authors who write expository texts research the topic to gain information. The information is organized in a logical and interesting manner using various expository text structures.
EXAMPLE EXPOSITIVE TEXT
What are animals thinking? They feel empathy, grieve, seek joy just like us.
BY YUDHIJIT BHATTACHARJEE.
PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 15, 2022.
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC.
I have lived for eight years now with my dog, Charlie—a bloodhound who’s embarrassingly bad at tracking scents. He greets me jubilantly every time I come home, even if it’s from a quick grocery run. I can hear his tail go thump-thump-thump on the floor in the next room when I laugh; he echoes my mirth even when he can’t see me. 
Yet, despite sharing this bond, I often sit down next to him on the couch, give him a hug, and ask my wife, “Do you think he loves me?” “Yes, yes!” she replies, with only slight exasperation, which is charitable because I ask so often. 
This routine is almost like a ritual in our household. I wonder if Charlie has any thoughts about it. Looking at him sunning himself on our front porch makes me think about a deeper question: How much do animal minds resemble ours? Do other species have thoughts and feelings and memories the way we do? 
As humans, we still think of ourselves as exceptional beings, fundamentally different from other animals. Over the past half century, though, scientists have amassed evidence of intelligence in many nonhuman species. New Caledonian crows snip twigs to fish insect larvae from tree trunks. Octopuses solve puzzles and shield their dens by placing rocks at the entrance. We no longer doubt that many animals possess impressive cognitive abilities. But are they more than just sophisticated automatons, occupied solely with survival and procreation?
A growing number of behavioral studies, combined with anecdotal observations in the wild—such as an orca pushing her dead calf around for weeks—are revealing that many species have much more in common with humans than previously thought. Elephants grieve. Dolphins play for the fun of it. Cuttlefish have distinct personalities. Ravens seem to respond to the emotional states of other ravens. Many primates form strong friendships. In some species, such as elephants and orcas, the elders share knowledge gained from experience with the younger ones. Several others, including rats, are capable of acts of empathy and kindness. (Learn more about the hidden world of whale culture.)
PrevNext