Book Creator

EARTH LAYER

by A G Z

Pages 2 and 3 of 8

Earth´s Layers
Creater by: Ailin Guan 8C
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Introduction
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Earth is the only planet in the solar system known to support life. The rapidly rotating motion and the iron-nickel core of our planet generate an extensive magnetic field, which, together with the atmosphere, shields us from almost all harmful radiation from the Sun and other stars.
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Index
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Presentacion

Introduction

Index

Crust

Mantle

Outer core

Inner core
Crust
This is the outside layer of the earth and is made of solid rock, mostly basalt and granite. There are two types of crust; oceanic and continental. Oceanic crust is denser and thinner and mainly composed of basalt. Continental crust is less dense, thicker, and mainly composed of granite.
crust
Mantle
The mantle is the mostly solid bulk of Earth's interior. The mantle lies between Earth's dense, super-heated core and its thin outer layer, the crust. The mantle is about 2,900 kilometers (1,802 miles) thick, and makes up a whopping 84 percent of Earth's total volume.
mantle
Outer core
The outer core is the third layer of the Earth. It is the only liquid layer, and is mainly made up of the metals iron and nickel, as well as small amounts of other substances. The outer core is responsible for Earth's magnetic field. As Earth spins on its axis, the iron inside the liquid outer core moves around.
Inner core
The inner core is solid. The inner core is the part of the Earth that lies at the center. It contains a lot of iron at nickel at a very high temperature. It is solid because of the enormous pressure that the rest of the Earth applies to it.
Conclusion
In conclusion, Earth is composed of five main layers: the inner core, outer core, mantle, upper mantle, and crust. These layers vary in terms of composition, temperature, and physical properties. The inner core is solid and primarily composed of iron and nickel, while the outer core is in a liquid state. The mantle consists of semi-solid rock that flows over geological timescales, driving plate tectonics. The upper mantle plays a crucial role in convective currents, which contribute to the movement of tectonic plates. Finally, the Earth's crust is the outermost layer, where all terrestrial life and geological processes occur. Understanding these layers deepens our insight into the dynamic and complex nature of our planet.
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