Book Creator

Colonial Life

by Preston Slater

Pages 2 and 3 of 25

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Life on the Farm
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They only had small tools such as axes and saw which they used to cut wood into planks so they could build a house.

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For most Europeans, land was the main economic activity. On these lands, some colonist made mines and farms to get valuable materials to sell or trade. Most of the other people sourced their income on agriculture. The colonist that did this were usually self sufficient, and made the things that they needed. By 1750, not as many farmers did everything by themself, and about 20% of colonists were enslaved. Farmers all had to complete similar tasks such as clearing out trees and big plants.






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In 1750, one in 20 colonists lived in a city. Compared to living on a farm, living in the city was exciting. The main attraction was the waterfront. At the waterfront, ships would come by to share news from England, or deliver important things like paint to the colonists. Ships that came in from Africa carried slaves that were kidnapped by the English to be sold.










Market places were filled with fishermen trying to sell their catch, and farmers peddling the various material that they had gotten that day at the farm. Enslavers were also around selling people at the auction block. Close to the market and auction was the tavern where food and drinks were served to men. The other streets were filled with shops such as blacksmiths, shoe makers, tailors, and other craftspeople. Cities were often very smelly and loud. Church bells would ring and animals would be able to roam free. Homes in the city were close together, and were made with thatched roofs. Most houses had small windows because glass was very expensive. Because these houses were made from flammable material, the colonists all kept a bucket of water by their door in case a fire started.
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The people that lived in these houses had to all share the same room, with the only source of heat being the fireplace. Meals were cooked in a big metal cauldron above the fireplace. In the mornings, they all wake up at the same time to share chores such as feeding the livestock or gathering eggs from the chicken coop.
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Life in Cities
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In 1750, one in 20 colonists lived in a city. Compared to living on a farm, living in the city was exciting. The main attraction was the waterfront. At the waterfront, ships would come by to share news from England, or deliver important things like paint to the colonists. Ships that came in from Africa carried slaves that were kidnapped by the English to be sold.










Market places were filled with fishermen trying to sell their catch, and farmers peddling the various material that they had gotten that day at the farm. Enslavers were also around selling people at the auction block. Close to the market and auction was the tavern where food and drinks were served to men. The other streets were filled with shops such as blacksmiths, shoe makers, tailors, and other craftspeople. Cities were often very smelly and loud. Church bells would ring and animals would be able to roam free. Homes in the city were close together, and were made with thatched roofs. Most houses had small windows because glass was very expensive. Because these houses were made from flammable material, the colonists all kept a bucket of water by their door in case a fire started.
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